TAMARIND CHUTNEY & CORIANDER CHUTNEY – इम्ली की चट्नी व धनिए की चट्नी

Follow on Bloglovin

(A re-post with a fresh pictures and a recipe update, of the coriander chutney and tamarind chutney, that I had previously shared on April 17, 2011)

Coriander (cilantro) Chutney, also called the Green Chutney and Tamarind Chutney or Brown Chutney can be easily called the soul of most Indian street foods. These two condiments can be called the basic essentials of the anatomy of any chaat. The sweet and spicy tamarind chutney, with whole lot of fabulous spices, and the hot & tangy green chutney are perfect match. The two give a major flavor boost to street foods and chaat dishes. It is of course convenient to pick a jar of tamarind chutney off the aisle of a supermarket but trust me, they don’t do half the justice as the home made one. 

These two go well with Samosa and Kachori. And a bowl of Dahi Bhalle (also called Dahi Vada) is unthinkable without these two chutneys drizzled generously on the top. And when I talk about chaat, how could I not mention my absolute favorite – Palak Patta Chaat (Spinach Leaf Fritters in yogurt Sauce and drizzled with green and tamarind chutney) It is heavenly!!  (and vehemently recommended)

While we enjoy the tamarind chutney with our Chana Chaat, green chutney pairs well with this healthy and well balanced breakfast dish called Handvo (it is gluten free and vegan). It can be enjoyed with your savory pancakes. And how could I miss this delicious and super healthy Shakarkand Chaat (Pepped up Sweet Potatoes) that literally is made using this tamarind chutney. (For a more detailed insight into the Indian Chaat, I recommend you visit Bon Appetit guide to Indian Chaat)

TAMARIND CHUTNEY

60 grams Tamarind (seedless)

150 grams Jaggery (I almost always use the Date Palm Jaggery)

200 – 250 ml Water (depending on how thick or thin you want the chutney)

½ tsp Salt
¼ – ½  tsp Red Chilli Powder
¼ – ½ tsp Cumin Seeds (toasted and ground)
¼ – ½ tsp Fennel Seeds (toasted and ground)
¼ tsp Dry Ginger Powder
½ tbsp Pomegranate Arils (optional)
Add water and tamarind to a non reactive pot along with scrapped jaggery, chili powder and salt. Bring the contents to a boil and reduce the heat to minimum.
Simmer the contents for eight minutes. Switch off the heat and allow the contents to cool down.
Mash the contents with clean dry hands and remove as much pulp, as possible, from the tamarind.
Pass the contents through a sieve (you do not really need a fine mesh) and reserve the chutney in a bowl. 
Taste the chutney at this point to check if the sweetness or sourness suits your palate. If it is sweet, you can add some tamarind pulp and if it is sour, add some more palm sugar or plain white sugar. Now, add the rest of the ingredients except the pomegranate seeds. Add fennel powder, cumin powder and dry ginger powder and stir well to incorporate. If the chutney appears thin, simmer it again on low heat to the desired consistency. If it appears thick, add some water and give one boil. Switch off heat and cool the chutney. 
Transfer and store in a sterilized air tight glass jar. The chutney stays well, refrigerated, for nearly a month. (Add pomegranate arils only if you intend to make the chutney for immediate use. For storing, it is best to skip adding the pom arils to the chutney)
Serve it with whatever your heart fancies! 

Note – Ensure that the sieve, bowl and glass jar – all are dry. Also, always use a clean dry spoon to take chutney from the jar. 

Note – The sweet tamarind shown in the pictures is only for display. It is not used for making the chutney. Sour seedless tamarind was used for making this chutney. It is available at Asian and Indian stores. 

Note -The color of the chutney will depend on how mature the jaggery is. The mature and darker the jaggery, the deeper is the color of the chutney. 

Note – The amount of spices of course is adjustable and so is the ratio of jaggery to tamarind. This is the ratio we prefer. 

Note – If you are wondering why I have mentioned the amount of spices as one fourth to half a teaspoon, well that is because you need to add at least one fourth teaspoon and maximum of half a teaspoon of each spice for this much amount of chutney. Feel free to alter to suit your taste, though. 

Note – Ensure that you don’t make the chutney very thick since it will thicken further once it cools down. I usually keep it refrigerated which further thickens it. 

Makes – Approximately 250 – 300 ml (depending on the consistency)

CORIANDER or GREEN CHUTNEY 

4 C packed, fresh Coriander (picked and washed)

3 fat cloves Garlic (adjust to taste)

4 Green Chilies (adjust heat to taste)

Juice of 1 Lime (adjust sourness to taste)

Salt to taste (I used half a teaspoon of crushed pink salt)

Blitz everything together adding a couple of tablespoons of water till you attain a smooth consistency.

Taste and adjust the heat, salt and sourness.

Decant in a sterilized bottle, close the lid and store in the fridge.

It keeps well for two to three days.

Yield – 250 ml (amount will actually depend on how thick or thin the chutney is)

Thanks for your visit and see you soon again with another exciting recipe! 

Share

5 Comments

  1. Yippeee!!!. Was looking fr this yummy recipe. Going to try out soon.
    Everytime i buy this chutney from market for ‘dahi bhalle’ i think of trying it at home. Needed this simple n quick recipe badly.

    thnx a lot !!!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*


Use Captcha along with your comment. *