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It is a huge relief to be back in our own house after a month’s stay at the temporary accommodation post our return to Mumbai from Dubai. Yes, we are back to motherland for good. Despite loss of time, money and loads of stress that we suffered at the hands of unprofessional yet reputed movers and packers I am so glad to be in the comfort of my house. In the coming few weeks, I will be sharing a few posts that I had prepped in Dubai for these very days that I shall be spending in getting the house in order and settled.

As hideous as it looks, I have always loved eating this vegetable. I was a picky eater as a child and very few vegetables found favour with me. There used to be a raucous in the house when mom used to buy this vegetable. My brother would want to have it in curry while I preferred it stir fried, the so called ‘bhaaji’ form or the dry curry. In fact everyone in the house liked the curry. (I have always been the black sheep of the family :P). I have always had taste that were complete opposite to how my mum, dad or brother would like a particular dish. While everyone would love having Rooh Afza (rose flavoured concentrate) in their glass of lassi, I would hate the taste of anything that had to do with roses. I still can’t stand rose flavoured dishes, desserts or drinks. As any other mom would, my mother followed the middle path and told us that she would make each way alternately. If this week it was a curry, the next time it would be a stir fry. I shall post the recipe for the curry one later. As of now, it is the bhujiya style arbi.

300 grams Arbi/ Taro Root

¼ C (plus more if required) Oil

¼ tsp Asafoetida

½ tsp Cumin Seeds

½ tsp Mustard Seeds

1 large Onion

1 tbsp sliced Garlic (adjust the amount to taste)

1½ tsp finely chopped Root Ginger

1 or 2 Green Chili (as per how much heat you want)

1 ripe medium size Tomato

1/3 tsp Red Chili Powder

½ tsp Turmeric Powder

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1 tbsp Coriander Powder

1 tsp Garam Masala

1 tsp of Amchur/ Dry Mango Powder

Salt to taste

2 tbsp chopped fresh Coriander

A few tea spoon Mustard Oil

Method:

Apply mustard oil on your hands peel the arbi. (you can use any oil or use gloves)

Wash and pat dry it and cut the arbi vertically in equal sized strips. Apply the oil again while chopping the arbi. The oil will ensure that your hands do not itch later due to the sticky white milk released by the arbi. (do not cut the arbi too thin or it will dry out)

Heat oil in a kadahi (woh) and add asafoetida. Add the arbi to the kadahi and stir fry on high heat it till it turns golden brown in colour. Ensure that you do not leave the arbi unattended or it will get over fried. (If you kadahi is small in size do this in two batches). Remove on an absorbent sheet.

Grate the tomato and keep it aside and the slice it.

In the same kadahi, add the cumin seeds and mustard seeds (add oil if required). Once they begin to splutter, add onions, ginger and garlic. Fry them on medium heat till they turn golden in colour and then add the tomatoes and spices. Stir fry till the masala releases oil. (approximately a minute)

Then add the fried taro root and stir. Cover and cook for a few more minutes or till arbi is completely cooked.

Remove in the serving bowl and garnish with chopped coriander.

Serves – 4

Note: In case you do not have Amchur, sprinkle some Chaat Masala before serving.

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Thanks for visiting and see you again with another exciting recipe!

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